Tag Archives: Hyphessobrycon

Hyphessobrycon dorsalis

21. January 2022

Tetras, which – as Hans-Georg Evers so aptly put it – are magnificently white wine colored, have a hard time in aquarists. In the dealer’s tank there is usually nothing to be seen of the discreet colors and why, many ask, should one buy colorless fish when there are so many colorful species?

This opinion changes, if one gives oneself a jerk, and maintains a troop of perhaps 15 or 20 specimens of such white wine fishes in a well planted community aquarium together with the colorful classics (cardinal tetra etc.). Then you will notice that the “ugly gray ducklings” do not develop into magnificent swans, but they attract at least as much attention as their brightly colored cousins. The magic word is: contrast!

One such contrast fish is Hyphessobrycon dorsalis, which circulated in the hobby as “Hyphessobrycon minor” before its scientific description in 2014. It is the slimmest representative of the so-called “Rosy Tetras”, which are well characterized within the large group of small tetras by their white-black-white dorsal fin coloration. By the way, the fish from which the scientific description is based came from our facility. We imported them from Brazil via Manaus at that time, and our current import also comes from this source.

For our customers: the animals have code 261362 on our stock list. Please note that we supply only wholesale.

Text & photos: Frank Schäfer

Hyphessobrycon moniliger

9. December 2021

Under the name “Hasemania hansseni” a new tetra has recently appeared on the market, which with its intense orange coloration is indeed somewhat reminiscent of the well-known copper tetra, Hasamania nana. However, one of the characteristics of the genus Hasemania is that it lacks the adipose fin that is so typical for tetras. This is however present in the new imports. They are Hyphessobrycon moniliger, a species first mentioned in scientific literature by Lowe-McConnell in 1991 as “Hyphessobrycon sp. golden tetra”. It was then scientifically described in 2002 based on specimens from the Rio Tocantins drainage. In the meantime it was also reported from the Rio Tapajós drainage. 

The males of H. moniliger have broadened fin rays in the anal fin, which are also covered with numerous hooks. This characteristic is known rather from the Hemigrammus relationship, but as we have already mentioned several times, the systematics of the small tetras of South America is so far only very unsatisfactory clarified.

With about 4 cm total length H. moniliger remains handy small. They are very beautiful and peaceful fish, a real enrichment of the assortment!

For our customers: the animals have code 261393 on our stocklist. Please note that we only supply wholesale.

Text & photos: Frank Schäfer

Hyphessobrycon moniliger

19. July 2021

Under the name “Hasemania hansseni” a new tetra has recently appeared on the market, which with its intense orange coloration is indeed somewhat reminiscent of the well-known copper tetra, Hasemania nana. However, one of the characteristics of the genus Hasemania is that it lacks the adipose fin that is so typical for tetras. This is however present in the new imports. They are Hyphessobrycon moniliger, a species first mentioned in scientific literature by Lowe-McConnell in 1991 as “Hyphessobrycon sp. golden tetra”. It was then scientifically described in 2002 based on specimens from the Rio Tocantins drainage. In the meantime it was also reported from the Rio Tapajós drainage. 

The males of H. moniliger have broadened fin rays in the anal fin, which are also covered with numerous hooks. This characteristic is known rather from the Hemigrammus relationship, but as we have already mentioned several times, the systematics of the small tetras of South America is so far only very unsatisfactory clarified.

With about 4 cm total length H. moniliger remains handy small. They are very beautiful and peaceful fish, a real enrichment of the assortment!

For our customers: the animals have code 261393 on our stocklist. Please note that we only supply wholesale.

Text & photos: Frank Schäfer

Hyphessobrycon sp. “Muzel Red Cherry“

7. July 2021

From Brazil we received this really nice novelty, which looks a bit like an enlarged edition of the Ember tetra, Hyphessobrycon amandae. However has the “Muzel Red Cherry” two (although indistinct) shoulder spots, which never occurs in H. amandae.  In addition, the dorsal fin in “Muzel Red Cherry” is red with a light margin, while in H. amandae it has a large black spot on the posterior margin. The novelty also bears a certain resemblance to the “Bolivia Orange”, which in turn is placed in the relationship of Hyphessobrycon pulchripinnis (although it is completely different in coloration). In contrast to the “Bolivia Orange” the “Muzel Red Cherry” has a red caudal fin, this is transparent in “Bolivia Orange”. In addition, there is a sex difference in “Muzel Red Cherry”, which is missing in “Bolivia Orange”: the males of “Muzel Red Cherry” grow larger than the females and have enlarged fins, as known from the Rosy Tetras.

The origin of the novelty is still unknown, the imported animals are bred ones. As our supplier learned, the Brazilian ichthyologist Flavio Lima from the Universidade Estadual de Campinas in the state of Sao Paulo is working on the scientific description.

It will be interesting to see which genus Lima will come to, because the “Muzel Red Cherry” basically looks like a “Rosy Tetra” of the genus Hyphessobrycon, but it also has an incomplete lateral line and a scaled caudal fin base, both characteristics of Hemigrammus.

Anyway, this 3-4 cm long tetra is a real color wonder and a wonderful enrichment of the tetra assortment.

For our customers: the animals have code 261943 on our stocklist. Please note that we supply exclusively to wholesalers.

Text & photos: Frank Schäfer

Hyphessobrycon eques “Longfin”

28. June 2021

The Serpa Tetra, also called the Callistus Tetra (Hyphessobrycon eques, formerly known as H. callistus or H. serpae), is the little man’s piranha. Just like piranhas, serpa tetras have an irresistible urge to bite the fins of other fish. And they constantly want to test out who is the stronger. This makes many exciting observations in the aquarium, but one thing you hardly ever see is Serpa Tetras with their fins completely intact.

The magnificent coloration and interesting behavior make many aquarists overlook the naughtiness of fin biting since 1924. In the course of time even a veil-finned variety of these up to 4 cm long animals developed. It too always appears somewhat tattered, but this does not detract from their enjoying life and also recognizably causes the fish neither pain nor discomfort.

One must always maintain Serpa Tetras in as large a group as possible of 10, better 20 animals or more, and offer them a richly structured aquarium. Since they originate from southern South America, where it can get quite fresh at certain times of the year, they should not be kept at high temperatures above 24°C all year round. Every now and then a few weeks without heating at 18-20°C will do the animals a lot of good and improve the colors.

For our customers: Serpa Tetras „Longfin“ have code 261953 on our stock list. Please note that we supply only wholesale.

Hyphessobrycon micropterus

28. May 2021

In 1915 the scientist Carl Eigenmann described a new tetra genus, which he named Megalamphodus. Type species is M. megalopterus, an aquaristic very well known species: the Black Phantom Tetra. In 1997 Megalamphodus became a synonym of Hyphessobrycon. Of the remaining species assigned to Megalamphodus in 1915 (ecuadoriensis, eques, heteresthes, melanotus, micropterus), only the Serpae tetra, H. eques, is encountered in the hobby; the appearance of the others is largely unclear – they are known only from dead, preserved specimens.

Now we could import most likely one of these species: Hyphessobrycon micropterus. This tetra is considered endemic to the Rio Sao Francisco river system (it flows through the states of Minas Gerais, Bahia, Sergipe, Pernambuco and Alagoas in Brazil), so it occurs exclusively there. The Rio Sao Francisco flows in the east of Brazil and has no connection to other rivers, which easily explains the high percentage of species endemic there. 

Whether the pretty tetras now imported by us from the Rio Sao Francisco, which somewhat resemble very intensely colored Pristella, really belong to the species H. micropterus, which has been described over 100 years ago, must be shown by further, time-consuming investigations. Only in 2018 an almost identical looking species, H. piorskii, was described, but it occurs about 1,500 km further north (Maranhao state in the Munim and Preguiças rivers).

For our customers: the animals have code 261853 on our stocklist. Please note that we only supply wholesale.

Text & photos: Frank Schäfer

Hyphessobrycon heterorhabdus

26. February 2021

Already in 1894 the three-banded flag tetra (Hyphessobrycon heterorhabdus) was described scientifically; the animals on which the description was based came from the Brazilian state of Pará, more detailed information or illustrations are not available. From 1910 and in the 1920s, when the tetras advanced to the most popular aquarium fishes, also three-banded tetras came to Europe; these animals had a red, a white and a black longitudinal band over the entire body length – hence three-banded tetras. According to some sources, they came from the lower Rio Tocantins (whose lower reaches are in Pará), according to other sources from the southern tributaries of the middle Amazon (i.e. Rio Madeira, Rio Tapajós, Rio Xingu). A whole group of species has been named after the three-banded tetra – the Hyphessobrycon heterorhabdus group. They have a black longitudinal band as a common characteristic. From the Hyphessobrycon heterorhabdus group many new species have been described in the last years and some more are already known but not formally described yet; this makes identification not easy.

We have now received very nice animals of this group with the locality Apeú, whereby it is not specified whether this means the district of the large city Castanhal in Pará or the small river Apeú, which flows through the district of the same name, but this forgives nothing. Freshly arrived the animals showed only two stripes, one light and one black, which is why we first determined the species as Hyphessobrycon agulha, but after a few days of acclimation red colored scales were also visible above the light longitudinal band. We are now of the opinion that this is indeed the “true” H. heterorhabdus, while the central Amazonian form mentioned in the old literature probably belonged to the species Hyphessobrycon sateremawe described only last year (2020). H. sateremawe differs from H. heterorhabdus by a much wider black longitudinal band.

For our customers: the animals have code 261103 on our stocklist. Please note that we supply exclusively to wholesalers.

Text & photos: Frank Schäfer

Hyphessobrycon “ornatus White Fin” XL

29. May 2020

We just have a tank full of fully grown rosy tetra (Hyphessobrycon rosaceus) of the breeding form “White Fin” in stock. These magnificent fish are a real feast for the eyes. Read more about this form of fish, which is also known as H. bentosi or H. ornatus in the hobby here: https://www.aquariumglaser.de/en/fish-archives/hyphessobrycon-ornatus-white-fin-2/

For our customers: the animals have code 262014 on our stocklist. Please note that we only supply wholesale.

Text & photos: Frank Schäfer

Hyphessobrycon hexastichos

25. October 2019

This pretty tetra is a double of the very similarly colored species Moenkhausia agnesae. It remains however with 5,5 cm length smaller than M. agnesae, which becomes nearly 7 cm long. In addition, H. hexastichos, which occurs exclusively in the upper catchment area of the Rio Tapajós in Brazil, is not as quarrelsome as M. agnesae.

We have now received again a small number of German offspring of this beautiful rarity. 

For our customers: the animals have code 261153 on our stocklist. Please note that we only supply the wholesale trade.

Text & photos: Frank Schäfer

Hyphessobrycon peruvianus

27. May 2019

Three species of tetra in northern South America are obviously close relatives to each other and often confused: Hyphessobrycon loretoensis from Peru, H. metae from Colombia, and H. peruvianus, again from Peru. From these, H. loretoensis has been portayed here: http://www.aquariumglaser.de/en/hyphessobrycon-loretoensis_de_1188.html.

Currently we were able to import the second Peruvian species once more, H. peruvianus, in wonderful, large specimens. It can be distinguished best from its close relative, H. loretoensis, by the coloration of the caudal fin. In H. peruvianus the black longitudinal band extends far in the caudal fin. Above and below it is often accompanied by red spots. The lobes of the caudal fin are hyaline. In H. loretoensis the black band ends shortly after the caudal fin origin. The caudal fin is completely red.

Regarding the aquarium maintanace there is no great difference between the two species, both are extremely beautiful fish that fit perfectly for any blackwater community tank.

For our customers: the fish have code 261453 on our stocklist. Please note that we exclusively supply the wholesale trade.

Lexicon: Hyphessobrycon: ancient Greek, means “small Brycon”. Brycon is another genus of tetras. peruvianus: means “originating from Peru”. loretoensis: after the Loreto province in Peru. metae: after the Rio Meta.

Text & Photos: Frank Schäfer